Scope of Work for Week 7 (Sept. 21-Sept. 25)

Wayne County High School Daily Lesson Plan

Teacher:              Manning, Hardy,

Course:                English I/English I Acc.

Date(s):  Monday, Sept. 21-Friday, Sept. 25, 2015

Mississippi Frameworks      MS State Standards—“The Necklace”

•       9.3.a.3 Revising: Revise for clarity and coherence [consistent point of view (first person, third person), tone, transition, etc.]; Add and delete information and details (for audience, for purpose, for unity, etc.); Use precise language (appropriate vocabulary, concise wording, action verbs, sensory details, colorful modifiers, etc.); Use available resources (reference materials, technology, etc.)

•       9.2.e.1 The student will analyze (e.g., interpret, compare, contrast, evaluate, etc.) literary elements in multiple texts from a variety of genres and media for their effect on meaning. Literary Text and Literary Non-fiction: Drama (e.g., character, structure, techniques [e.g., soliloquy], mood, tone, conflict, imagery, allusion, figurative language, stylistic devices, dramatic irony, language/word choice, foreshadowing, etc.)

•       9.2.b The student will recognize text structures (e.g., description, comparison and contrast, sequential order, cause and effect, order of importance, spatial order, process/procedural, problem/solution) and analyze their effect on theme, author's purpose, etc.

•       9.1.c The student will analyze word choice and diction, including formal and informal language, to determine the author's purpose.

•       9.2.a The student will apply understanding of text features (e.g., introduction, bibliography, prologue, charts, graphics, footnotes, preface, afterword, sidebars, etc.) to verify, support, or clarify meaning.

•       9.2.d The student will analyze or evaluate texts to synthesize responses for summary, precis, explication, etc.

•       9.2.e.1 The student will analyze (e.g., interpret, compare, contrast, evaluate, etc.) literary elements in multiple texts from a variety of genres and media for their effect on meaning. Literary Text and Literary Non-fiction: Short stories, novels, biographies, autobiographies, narrative essays (e.g., character, setting, plot, conflict, theme, mood, tone, point of view, allusion, figurative language, stylistic devices, dramatic irony, symbolism, imagery, language/word choice, foreshadowing, flashback, etc.)

•       9.3.a.5 Publishing: Proofread final text; Prepare final text (PowerPoint, paper, poster, display, oral presentation, writing portfolio, personal journal, classroom wall, etc.)

 

Common Core Standards—“The Necklace”

•       Speaking and Listening 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

•       Reading Literature 5. [for literary text] Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

•       Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

•       Language 4.b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).

•       Speaking and Listening 1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

•       Reading Literature 4. [for literary text] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

•       Reading Literature 2. [for literary text] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

•       Reading Literature 2. [for literary text] Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text

•       Language 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

•       Language 4.c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

•       Language 4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9-10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

•       Reading Literature 3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

•       Reading Literature 5. [for literary text] Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

•       Reading Literature 4. [for literary text] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

Common Core     .

Monday

 

Focus of Lesson

(Student-Friendly Objective & #s)

Inference, conflict, characterization, cause and effect, irony

Eagle Challenge (3-5 minutes)

Writing prompt: Give an example of an ironic situation in your life

Learning Tasks/Activities

Students will read orally "The Interlopers" noting the irony in both stories. They will also relate back to “The Most Dangerous Game” as they discuss ironic situations and conflict. Students will be able to find four examples of irony and will be able to identify the conflict with the main characters.. Students will complete the All in One Workbook Pages "Literary Analysis -- Irony and Surprise Ending for both stories.

Text/Materials

Literature Book; All-in-One Workbook

Closure

•              Closure/Homework --" Integrated language skills: Grammar." Principal parts of verbs -- All in one Workbook. (grade)

Remediation (if needed)

Remediation for students who did not do well on The Most Dangerous Game

Enrichment

Acc-- All in one workbook "Enrichment -- Calculating Inflation"

Group Composition (if used)

Paired activities

Assessment(s)-Pretests & Posttests

Formal and Informal

     

Tuesday

 

Focus of Lesson

(Student-Friendly Objective & #s)

Inference, conflict, characterization, cause and effect, and irony

Eagle Challenge (3-5 minutes)

Page 119 from Elements of Language 3rd course

Learning Tasks/Activities

Introduce Reading Skill: Cause & Effect and Literary Analysis Concept: characterization(direct/indirect). (p. 313)

o              Discuss and generate notes and examples. Teacher may use PPT.

•              Introduce selection Vocabulary (p. 330)

o              Students will say the word aloud chorally, use the word in a sentence independently, and choose the best vocabulary word for each definitional sentence chorally.

•              Introduce Word Study skills on p. 330. In pairs, have students generate a list of words that use each skill. (ject)

•              Build background with the Background feature (p. 331 or online)

•              Prepare to read by Activating Prior Knowledge (p. 332)

o              Anticipation Guide—Students copy four statements on notebook paper and mark their responses (agree/disagree).

Study guide for Benchmark 3

                •             

Text/Materials

Literature textbook

Closure

•              Closure:  Respond to the Anticipation Guide statements again. Did anything change? Why? Why not? Use specific details, quotation, or other evidence from the text to support your response.

Remediation (if needed)

Benchmark 3 skills

Enrichment

Think-pair-share ideas from "The Necklace" -- What would you do?

Group Composition (if used)

     

Assessment(s)-Pretests & Posttests

Formal and Informal

     

Wednesday

 

Focus of Lesson

(Student-Friendly Objective & #s)

Inference, conflict, characterizations, cause and effect, irony

Eagle Challenge (3-5 minutes)

     

Learning Tasks/Activities

•              Watch and discuss the book trailer for “The Necklace”.

•              Informally monitor comprehension while reading “The Necklace” (p. 333)

o              Whole-Group-Reading—Students will be in collaborative groups to discuss the plot and literary elements. We will be “chunking” the text.

o              When students come to a blue icon in the text, they will stop, discuss what they read, write any unfamiliar words. They will read the selected portion again looking for context clues to help understand the difficult words and answer the reading check questions.

•              All-in-One Workbook page 97 & 98— Character/Characterization & Cause/Effect

•              Textbook: Page 343: Vocabulary and Word Study

•              Independently read “The Necklace” responding  to the Characterization and Cause & Effect prompts. (page 333).  

•              Closure: Textbook: Page 343: Literary Analysis

•              Homework: Textbook: Page 342: Critical Thinking Questions

Textbook/Materials

Textbook, workbook

Closure

Literary Analysis: Texbook: Page 343

Remediation (if needed)

     

Enrichment

     

Group Composition (if used)

     

Assessment(s)-Pretests & Posttests

Formal and Informal

 

Thursday

 

Focus of Lesson

(Student-Friendly Objective & #s)

Inference, conflict, characterizations, cause and effect, symbolism

Eagle Challenge (3-5 minutes)

     

Learning Tasks/Activities

•              Review & Practice Cause & Effect in collaborative groups.

o              Page 282-283.

•              Introduce Conventions Skill: Active & Passive Voice

o              Page 372: Practice A (whole class instruction) Practice B (independent work)

o              Grammar Workbook p. 128-129. Practice 1—Whole Group; Practice 2—Independent

•              Outdoor Activity to reinforce Active & Passive Voice.

•              All-in-One Workbook page 103 & 107—Dialogue & Dialect

Textbook/Materials

Literature book; All-in-one-workbook; Grammar workbook

Closure

Active-Passive Voice activity

Remediation (if needed)

     

Enrichment

Active Passive Voice activity

Group Composition (if used)

     

Assessment(s)-Pretests & Posttests

Formal and Informal

Thumbs-up; thumbs-down on active-passive voice

Friday

 

Focus of Lesson

(Student-Friendly Objective)

Functional documents

Eagle Challenge (3-5 minutes)

     

Learning Tasks/Activities

Reinforcement of Grammar Skills

Pages 344 Subjects and predicates; 372, Active and Passive voice

Functional documents -- filling out forms, job applications, driver's license applications etc.

Notes on symbolism, symbol, and allegory

Textbook/Materials

Textbook  Pages 376 - 381

Closure

To introduce the students to our next lesson focus, students will look around the room and write down as many symbols/symbollic representations that they can find. Students must have a minimum of six symbols as their exit slip.

Remediation (if needed)

     

Enrichment

     

Group Composition (if used)

     

Assessment(s)-Pretests & Posttests

Formal and Informal

Quiz on The Necklace

IEP Accommodation (if applicable)

     

Other Information

(Questions, special instructions, etc.)