Week 3

Wayne County High School Daily Lesson Plan 

Course: Introduction to Biology Date(s):8-18-14 to 8-22-14

Teacher: Boutwell

Framework Competency and Objective

COMPETENCIES AND OBJECTIVES: 

2. Describe the biochemical basis of life and explain how energy flows within and between the living systems.

a. Explain and compare with the use of examples the types of bond formation (e.g., covalent, ionic, hydrogen, etc.) between or among atoms. (DOK 2) 

Subatomic particles and arrangement in atoms

Importance of ions in biological processes

b. Develop a logical argument defending water as an essential component of living systems (e.g., unique bonding and properties including polarity, high 

specific heat, surface tension, hydrogen bonding, adhesion, cohesion, and expansion upon freezing). (DOK 2)

c. Classify solutions as acidic, basic, or neutral and relate the significance of the pH scale to an organism’s survival (e.g., consequences of having different 

concentrations of hydrogen and hydroxide ions). (DOK 2)

Monday

Closure Students will be asked to demonstrate knowledge of atoms by drawing a diagram of one of 6 atoms 

Tuesday

a. Explain and compare with the use of examples the types of bond formation (e.g., covalent, ionic, 

hydrogen, etc.) between or among atoms. (DOK 2) 

Subatomic particles and arrangement in atoms 

Importance of ions in biological processes 

Student will learn the structure of atoms and compare different atoms. 

TLW be able to relate the particle structure of an atom to the 

 identity of elements. 

What is the smallest particle of any substance?

The students will be asked to demonstrate knowledge of atoms by creating a model of an atom using 

objects found within the classroom. The student will also show the relationships between atoms in 

compounds by working in groups.

Students will understand how to read the periodic table.

Students will be introduced to the elements that are the most important for the human body.

important to the human body.

a. Explain and compare with the use of examples the types of bond formation (e.g., covalent, ionic, 

hydrogen, etc.) between or among atoms. (DOK 2) 

Subatomic particles and arrangement in atoms 

Importance of ions in biological processes 

TLW be able to relate the formation of covalent and ionic chemical bonds 

 to the stability of atoms

Students will be given a puzzle of atoms to figure out.

Be tested on lab safety, safety symbols, lab procedures, charts and graphs.

Draw models of carbon atoms to reinforce bonding & stability

Discuss covalent, ionic, and hydrogen bonds

Create structural models in 3-D

Focus on chemical equations photosynthesis and cellular resperation.

Closure Students will be asked to explain the 3-D model that they built in class.

Wednesday

b. Develop a logical argument defending water as an essential component of living systems (e.g., 

unique bonding and properties including polarity, high specific heat, surface tension, hydrogen bonding, 

adhesion, cohesion, and expansion upon freezing). (DOK 2) 

TLW be able to relate water's unique features to polarity, high specific heat, surface tension, hydrogen 

bonding, adhesion, cohesion, and expansion upon freezing.

What are some properties of water?

Why do you think that water is considered the most important molecule on earth?

Learning Tasks/Activities TTW: Demonstrate the properties of water by using some visual aids and demonstrations to help the 

students understand key concepts about the bonding patterns of water and physical properties. 

TSW: Solve problems and identify the properties of water by creating their own demonstrations of the 

properties of water. They will also work in the SATP spiral book.

Students will be grouped and do various small experiments to show the properties of water.

Solve problems and identify the properties of water by creating their own demonstrations of the 

properties of water. 

Closure Class wide discussion about the importance of water.

Thursday

Learning Tasks/Activities TTW: discuss common solutions that students interact with that are acids and bases. Identify common 

Closure TTW: Ask question about the subject matter of the day to assess knowledge. 

Friday

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

Learning Tasks/Activities pH lab

Closure Students will be asked to reflect on the foods that they have eaten over the last two days to identify 

c. Classify solutions as acidic, basic, or neutral and relate the significance of the pH scale to an 

organism’s survival (e.g., consequences of having different concentrations of hydrogen and hydroxide 

ions). (DOK 2) 

TLW identify compounds as acidic, basic and neutral.

Name 3 acids and 3 bases found in almost every home.

uses for acids and bases.

TSW: compile a list of common acids and bases found in their everyday life. 

Understand the importance that acids and bases play in the human body. Relate the pH scale into a 

nonlinguistic representation.

Students will be shown a demonstration showing the power of acids and bases.

Compile a list of common acids and bases found in their everyday life. 

Understand the importance that acids and bases play in the human body. Relate the pH scale into a 

nonlinguistic representation.

TTW: give a preview of the following day’s lesson.

TLW compare the chemical structures of carbohydrates and lipids. 

What are carbohydrates?

What are Lipids?

Students will be quizzed on basic chemistry, subatomic particles, waters properties, and pH.

Students will be introduced to carbohydrates and lipids.

Students will build on previous knowledge of food and distinguish between carbs. and lipids.

carbs. and lipids.