Scope of Work 2016-2017

ICT II

Pacing Guide for 1st Nine Weeks

1 - Orientation, Ethics, and Keyboarding Continuation *(Ongoing)

2 - Lab Management and Networking

9 - Career Preparation

We will be doing NWEA Map and I-Ready testing in the ICT Labs. 

 

Personal Financial Literacy: Checking

Overview

In this lesson, students will learn the benefits of checking accounts, as well as precautions one must take

with these accounts. They will practice using a checking account by making deposits, writing checks,

and maintaining a record of transactions.

 

Grade:  8

 

Materials:

  • “Making a Deposit” handout, attached
  • “Writing a Check” handout, attached
  • Mock deposit slips, attached
  • Transaction register, attached
  • What I Have to Sell cards, attached
  • “Keeping a Running Balance” activity, attached

Duration:

55 Minutes

 

Procedure

1. Ask students to brainstorm reasons why someone might want to open a checking account. In other

words, what are the benefits of using checks instead of cash? After students have had an opportunity

to respond, fill in what they may have missed. Some reasons to open a checking account include:

? Safety: You may not feel safe walking around with a lot of cash. Additionally, a stolen ATM/debit

card or stolen checks can be replaced, while stolen cash is simply gone.

? Convenience: If you use an ATM card or checks you do not always have to have cash to make a

purchase. Also, it’s a bad idea to send cash through the mail to pay bills. Finally, you can usually

access your checking account easily by using your check/debit card.

? Easier Budgeting: A checking account can help you budget your money. When you use your

check register to record debit card transactions or checks you have written, you are automatically

keeping track of where your money is going, making it easier to track your spending habits.

? Proof of Payment: Checks are written proof that you made a payment to someone. Each time you write a check that “clears” (the money is taken from your account), there is a record of it. If anyone ever challenges that you did not make a payment, you can always use your check transaction record to prove it.

? Additionally, you might be someone who knows that cash in your pocket is too easily spent.

Having a checkbook instead of cash might help you to be less impulsive in your purchases,

saving you money in the long-run.

2. Opening a checking account is an easy thing to do. However, not all checking accounts are created

equal. There are some important factors to consider when opening a checking account. Ask students

if they can think things they would want to consider when opening a checking account. Explain each

of the following:

? Location: branch offices; hours of operation; availability of ATMs

? Fees: monthly fees; per check fees; printing of checks; balance inquiry fees; ATM fees

? Other charges: overdraft charge; stop-payment fees; certified check fees

? Interest: rate earned; minimum deposit to earn interest; compounding method; fee charged for

falling below necessary balance

? Restrictions: minimum balance; deposit insurance; holding period for deposited checks

? Special features: direct deposit; automatic payments; overdraft protection; online banking;

discounts or free checking for students, seniors, or employees of certain companies

Once you decide that you want a checking account, you will need to actually “open” it. In order to

do so, you will usually need to bring 2 forms of identification and whatever money you want to

deposit to the bank. You will fill out some paper work, and about a week later, you should receive a

box of checks in the mail, preprinted with your name and address, along with a check register to

record your transactions.

? Optional Activity: Either individually or in partners, instruct students to go onto the Internet and

research various banks and the checking accounts they offer. Have students search for which bank

they feel offers the checking account that is the best deal for them. Have them summarize the

information above, then report back to class. As students report back, track the details of the various

bank’s accounts on the board to compare/contrast the decisions students made.

3. Now that you have your checks, what do you need to know? There are a few precautions that

students need to be made aware of:

? Most importantly, students must understand that writing a check is like writing a binding

contract. When you sign the bottom of a check, you are agreeing to pay the specified amount on

demand. If you write a check that you do not have enough funds to cover, you stand to lose even

more money in the end than the check was written for. Why? Because when you “bounce” a

check, you usually must pay the person or business a fee on top of what you already owe them

(most businesses charge a “Returned Check Fee” of $25). Also, most banks charge an additional

fee for having to cover your expense (unless the bank has overdraft protection). In sum, if you

bounce a check written for $25, you are likely to end up paying upwards of $75!

? Always write checks in ink.

? Once you endorse a check (sign the back of it), anyone can cash it. So you should never endorse

checks you plan on depositing later. As an added measure, some people write “For Deposit Only” below their endorsement.

? Keep unused checks in a place where others will not have easy access to them.

Check your statement regularly to make sure there was no unauthorized activity. Make sure

everything on your statement matches everything in your register (to be discussed momentarily).

Most banks offer online statements that are updated almost daily.

4. Distribute/Present “Making a Deposit” and “Writing a Check” handouts. Go over each section of

deposit slip and check with class. On the board or overhead, fill in a deposit slip and check to serve

as an example for the next activity.

5. Give each student 1 deposit slip, 4 blank checks, and a transaction register. Write the following on

the board:

To deposit:

 -Cash: $200.00

 -Checks: Check #9283: $187.58 (paycheck)

 Check #738: $12.42 (rebate check)

 Check #342: $50.00 (gift from relative)

Have students individually fill out deposit slips and check registers (the first deposit has already

been filled out as an example), referring to their “Making a Deposit” handout if necessary. Spot

check to make sure they are filling them out correctly. When all students have finished, go over

register as a class (at this point, everyone’s register should be identical). Distribute the “What I

Have to Sell” cards. Explain that students now have $450 in their “checking accounts.” Their task

is to take 12 minutes to find 2-4 people that have an item for sale they would like to purchase.

They are to purchase that item using a properly filled out check. (Students should assume they

have unlimited “items” to sell as listed on the card they receive. In other words, several students

can purchase the same item from the seller). Every time a transaction takes place, both the buyer and seller should properly document it in their transaction record. Encourage students to check

each other’s transaction records. When time is up, have students take an extra minute to

“balance” their checkbooks.

6. Check/Debit cards have become an increasingly popular alternative to writing checks. In fact, when

you open up a checking account, you will more than likely receive a check card in addition to a

checkbook. Compared to checks, there is less to carry around and transactions usually go faster. The

difference between a check card and a credit card is that with a check card, you can only spend

money you already have in your account instead of money you will earn and payback later. The

rights and responsibilities with a check card are virtually the same as those with a checking account,

with the added responsibility of memorizing and protecting your PIN number and immediately

reporting when a check card is lost or stolen.

Culminating Activity

? “Keeping a Running Balance Activity” (see attachment). You may want to assign this for

homework.

 

 

 

 

October 13-16, 2015

 

ICT II Lesson Plans:

 

Unit 3 Competency 1 - Discover career opportunities within the Finance career cluster.

Suggested Objective a:  Research career opportunities for employment in financial literacy by exploring the Finance career cluster

Finance

There are many career options available for people in the Finance career cluster.  Areas or career paths include corporate finance, commercial banking, investment banking, financial planning, insurance, and public accounting to name only a few.  Each path is unique in its requirements and skills required.  



 

 

September 28-October 2

 

Unit 2 Competency 1 - Discover career opportunities within the Information Technology career cluster.

Suggested Objective a:  Research career opportunities for employment in lab management and networking by exploring the Information Technology career cluster

 

Post-it-face
 

There are 16 national career clusters.  One career cluster that we will investigate now is the Information Technology area.  Click the links below to learn more about this field.

Information Technology  (Links to an external site.)by CareerTech.org (Links to an external site.) has several files that provide information for plans of study and knowledge and skills requirements.  As you look at this page, notice there are 5 broad areas in this cluster.  Each has its own plan of study and knowledge and skills statements that are downloadable.

The O*NET Online (Links to an external site.) website allows one to view careers based on areas inside the Information Technology (Links to an external site.) career cluster.  Look at the various occupations in this cluster.  Notice the "category" in which the occupation falls.  When you click on the link for the occupation, detailed information for job descriptions, requirements, and skills are provided.

 

Unit 1 Competency 4 - Discover career opportunities within the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security career cluster.

Suggested Objective a:  Research career opportunities for employment in law, public safety, corrections, and security by exploring the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

 

The Law

There are 16 national career clusters.  One career cluster that we will investigate now is the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security area.  Click the links below to learn more about this field.

Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (Links to an external site.) by CareerTech.org has several files that provide information for plans of study and knowledge and skills requirements.  As you look at this page, notice there are 5 broad areas in this cluster.  Each has its own plan of study and knowledge and skills statements that are downloadable.

The O*NET Online (Links to an external site.) website allows one to view careers based on areas inside the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (Links to an external site.) career cluster.  Look at the various occupations in this cluster.  Notice the "category" in which the occupation falls.  When you click on the link for the occupation, detailed information for job descriptions, requirements, and skills are provided.

Law, Public Safety, and Security Career Cluster (Links to an external site.)

 

Suggested Objective b:  Examine the requirements, skills, wages, education, and employment opportunities in at least one career pathway from the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

 Hastings Pier fire burns

 

Working in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster requires many varied skills and education.  Each career pays a wage that may be different based on many factors - education, training, knowledge, experience.  Careers in this area have different employment opportunities as well.  Let's take a few websites that offer insight into this cluster and research careers.

ISeek Careers  (Links to an external site.)is one website that can be used to research the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster.  Thissite (Links to an external site.) has links that can be clicked to see careers in the cluster, industries in the cluster, fields of study, and more.  Notice at the bottom of the page some suggestions for possible interest in the cluster are provided.  For example, if you like to debate with people, a career in this area might be a good place for you to be considering looking.  Suggestions for learning more about careers in this area are given as well.  Example - volunteer with different programs for at risk youth.  Take a moment to look at this site (Links to an external site.).

McGraw Hill  (Links to an external site.)has posted on its website and College and Career Readiness page (Links to an external site.) related to the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster.  You will find a definition for the cluster and possible careers in the area.  Many of the careers have clickable links that will provide information on earnings and skills needed as well as the outlook for the career.  There are articles for seeking careers in the area that can be read.

Websites we viewed earlier from O*NET (Links to an external site.) and Career Tech.org  (Links to an external site.)will provide information for outlook, earnings, and more. 

 

Suggested Objective c:  Link technology skills and knowledge of ethics with employment opportunities in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

 

Balance Scales (Ethics)

The PowerPoint below was retrieved from Michigan. This was the web address used on September 8, 2014.  As you scroll through the PowerPoint, notice the definition for ethics and character.  Slide 8 reveals character traits for ethical people.  Further the PowerPoint explains the importance of ethics in a public safety.  Lastly, notice it presents information for different types of ethics and allows oportunity for an ethical issues discussion and how ethics affects job performance.

Topics for September 14-18

September 14-18, 2015

Shaunda Graybill

 

Unit 2 Competency 1 - Discover career opportunities within the Information Technology career cluster.

a:  Research career opportunities for employment in lab management and networking by exploring the Information Technology career cluster

 

b:  Examine the requirements, skills, wages, education, and employment opportunities in at least one career pathway from the Information and Technology career cluster

 

Monday:  Students will research one career opportunity in lab management and networking by exploring the Information Technology career cluster.  They will answer questions about the chosen career.

 

Tuesday:  Students will continue to research one career in lab management and networking.  Students will begin a PowerPoint Presentation on chosen career.

Wednesday:  Students will complete a three minute timed writing test.  Students will continue to work on PowerPoint Presentation.

 

Thursday:  Students will put final touches on PowerPoint Presentation.  They must include slide transitions, sound, and animations.

 

Friday:  Students will present PowerPoint Presentations to the class.

 

 

Topics for September 8-11

 

Network Topology Activity.docView in a new window

7 Essential Elements of Communication.pptx
View in a new window

View in a new windowNetwork Topologies Presentation.pptxView in a new window

Network Topologies Presentation.pptxView in a new window

Network Topologies Worksheet.docxView in a new window

Network Topology Activity.docView in a new window

Topologies-lesson 2.pdfView in a new window

Topology PowerPoint.pptxView in a new window

 

Topics for August 31-September4, 2015

 

 

Unit 2 Competency 3 - Demonstrate network design and management.

Suggested Objective a:  Recognize different ways to set up a network using multiple typologies.

 

Suggested Objective e:  Troubleshoot common problems in a networked computer lab

Star_Topology

 


 

 

Topics for August 24-28

 

Unit 1

Competency 4 - Discover career opportunities within the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security career cluster.

Objective a:  Research career opportunities for employment in law, public safety, corrections, and security by exploring the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

Objective b:  Examine the requirements, skills, wages, education, and employment opportunities in at least one career pathway from the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

Objective c:  Link technology skills and knowledge of ethics with employment opportunities in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security career cluster

Unit 1 Competency 5 - Interact with teachers, peers, and course material using a learning management system.

Objective a:  Discover online learning environments and how they operate among teachers and students

 

 

August 17-21

Monday

 Discuss meaning of terms “ethics”.

 Watch video on “What employees expect of you”

 Place notes in notebook.

 Work in small groups to complete Ethics in Workplace activity.

Tuesday

          Ss will:

          Watch video on plagiarism.

         Discuss how to avoid plagiarism.

 Use website to complete a webquest on copyright basics.  Discuss answers in 

Wednesday

          Review ethics in relation to computers, occupational, and education.

         Create an online comic strip illustrating ethics.

         Students who finish early will be allowed to play Computer Ethics Jeopardy.

         http://www.superteachertools.com/jeopardyx/jeopardy-review-game.php?gamefile+1314370386

Thursday

         Ss will:

         Complete a webquest on copyright laws http://www.copyrightkids.org/

         Discuss plagiarism

 

Friday

Ss will:

Complete a webquest about viruses and other harmful components of the internet.  Work with a partner to complete webquest.