August 26-30

 UNITED STATES HISTORY FROM POST-RECONSTRUCTION TO PRESENT

 

Domestic Affairs

_X__1. Understand the evolution of the American political system, its ideals, and institutions post-reconstruction.

 

          _X_a. Cite and analyze evidence that the United States Constitution is a ?living document as reflected in Supreme Court cases, Amendments, and presidential actions. (DOK 3)

          _X_b. Analyze and evaluate the impact of presidential policies and congressional actions on domestic reform. (DOK 3)

          _X_c. Explain and analyze the expansion of federal powers. (DOK 3)

          ___d. Analyze and evaluate the ongoing tension between individual liberty and national security. (DOK 3)

 

_X_2. Understand major social problems and domestic policy issues in post-reconstruction American society.

 

        _X_a. Explain how American society has been impacted by the entry of more women, minorities, and immigrant workers into the labor force. (DOK 2)

       _X_b. Trace the response of American institutions such as government and non-profit organizations to environmental challenges such as natural disasters, conservation and pollution, and property rights (including but not limited to the expansion of the national park system, the development of environmental protection laws, and imminent domain). (DOK 2)

       ___c. Compare and contrast various social policies such as welfare reform and public health insurance and explain how such social policies are influenced by the persistence of poverty. (DOK 2)

 

Global Affairs

___3. Understand how the global position of the United States has evolved as a result of imperialism, economics, technological changes, and involvement in international wars and conflicts.

 

        ____a. Analyze the effects of imperialism on the foreign policy of the United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (DOK 3)

        ____b. Compare and contrast the arguments between the imperialists and anti-imperialists in the late 19th century and justify why the imperialists prevailed. (DOK 3)

       ____c. Draw conclusions about the causes and effects of American involvement in the world wars. (DOK 3)

       ____d. Analyze the origins and development of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union and their respective allies, including ideology, technology, economics, and geography. (DOK 3)

       ____e. Explain and analyze America‘s role in international organizations, humanitarian relief, and post-war reconstruction efforts throughout the 20th century. (DOK 3)

       ____f. Analyze and evaluate the causes and effects of the United States‘ growing involvement in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf. (DOK 3)

 

Civil Rights/Human Rights

_X_4. Understand how the Civil Rights Movement achieved social and political change in the United States and the impact of the Civil Rights struggle of African Americans on other groups (including but not limited to feminists, Native Americans, Hispanics, immigrant groups, and individuals with disabilities).

 

       ___a. Analyze the issues that gave rise to the Civil Rights Movement from post-reconstruction to the modern movement. (DOK 3)

       _X_b. Trace the major events of the modern movement and compare and contrast the strategies and tactics for social change used by leading individuals/groups. (DOK 2)

       ___c. Analyze the response of federal and state governments to the goals (including but not limited to ending de jure and de facto segregation and economic inequality) of the Civil Rights Movement. (DOK 3)

      ___d. Evaluate the impact of the Civil Rights Movement in expanding democracy in the United States. (DOK 3)

      ___e. Compare and contrast the goals and objectives of other minority and immigrant groups to those of the Civil Rights Movement led predominantly by African-Americans. (DOK 2)

      _X_f. Cite and analyze evidence of the political, economic, and social changes in the United States that expanded democracy for other minority and immigrant groups. (DOK 3)

Economics

_X_5. Understand the continuing economic transformation of the United States involving the maturing of the industrial economy, the expansion of big business, the changing demographics of the labor force, and the rise of national labor unions and industrial conflict.

 

        __X_a. Evaluate the factors leading to and the effects of industrialization on the political, physical, and economic landscape of the United States during the late 19th and early 20th century. (DOK 3)

        __X_b. Explain the conditions of industrialization that led to the rise of organized labor and evaluate labor‘s effectiveness in achieving its goals. (DOK 3)

       __X_c. Identify and explain migration and immigration patterns that developed from the push-pull effects of economic circumstances. (DOK 2)

 

_X_6. Understand the scope of government involvement in the economy including the following: the regulation of industry and labor, the attempts to manipulate the money supply, and the use of tariffs or trade agreements to protect or expand U.S. business interests.

 

      _X_a. Cite and explain evidence that led to the transition of the U.S. economy from laissez-faire capitalism to an increasingly regulated economy. (DOK 2)

      _X_b. Analyze and evaluate historical arguments regarding monetary policy. (DOK 3)

      _X_c. Critique the government‘s use of tariffs and trade agreements. (DOK 3)

      ___d. Evaluate deficit spending as a means of financing government programs. (DOK 3)

 

Culture

__X_7. Understand cultural trends, religious ideologies, and artistic expressions that contributed to the historical development of the United States.

 

      ___a. Examine cultural artifacts (including but not limited to visual art, literature, music, theatre, sports) to contextualize historical developments. (DOK 2)

      _X_b. Analyze and evaluate the impact of religion on various social movements, domestic/foreign policies, and political debates. (DOK 3)

      ___c. Evaluate the role mass media has played in shaping perceptions toward certain policies, social groups, other nations, and political ideas. (DOK 3)

      _X_d. Contrast modernism and traditionalism relating to social change. (DOK 2)

                  _X_e. Cite and explain evidence of the diversity of the United States. (DOK 2)   

Key Ideas and Details

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.3 Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Craft and Structure

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including analyzing how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.6 Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.8 Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information.

•       CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.9 Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

           •              CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.10 By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.

Monday

 

Focus of Lesson

 (Student-Friendly Objective)

      The teacher will recap with the students and review over the key issues of the Gilded Age that faced the South and West.  The teacher will continue the discussion of the North by introducing new issues facing that region during the Gilded Age.

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

      Students will be working on their timeline which will be due at the end of class.

Learning Tasks/Activities

      Mini Lesson #1: The teacher will introduce the following topics: immigration, political machines, diseases that troubled the North, and monopolies and their impact.

Mini Lesson #2: The students will watch a clip from the series America: The Story of Us "Cities."  The teacher will engage the students in a discussion on the issues that faced growing urban areas in the North during the Gilded Age

Mini Lesson #3: The students will watch a video clip from Grover Cleveland and Ben Harrison's presidency, and they will analyze the presidential decisions that the men made and decide if they would have taken the country into a different direction.

 

 

 

Text/Materials

United States History 1877-Present, America: The Story of Us (Video), The Presidents (video), Gilded Age Portfolio

Closure 

The teacher will recap the impact that inventions like barbed wire, lightbulb, and the telephone had on the Gilded Age.  The teacher will close the lesson discussing how modern invention have changed/altered the way that Americans live today. 

Remediation/Intervention 

The teacher will walk around the classroom and check to make sure that all students are on topic and do not need further remediation.  The teacher will ask students to reiterate the important accomplishments of the presidents in case any student did not catch the information the first time given.  The teacher will also ask open ended questions to allow the students to use their peers knowledge to help them understand the topics covered.

Enrichment/Challenge for upper 25%

Students will be asked to not only list the important events that happened during the GIlded Age, but they will also be asked explain why the event was important and how it impacted history.  (All students are encouraged to do this, but the teacher expects for the more advanced students to take this assignment to the next level.  Extra effort will equal extra points on their timeline.)

Group Composition (If used)

Group discussion involving the important issues of the Gilded Age and President Cleveland and President Harrision.

Assessment (pre and/or post)

Informal assessment will be done as the teacher  reviews the students to see what areas need to be further explored for their test on Wednesday.

Tuesday

 

Focus of Lesson

 (Student-Friendly Objective)

      The students will be reviewed on the major issues involving the Gilded Age for their test on Wednesday.

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

      Students will work on their matching assignment & review questions in their portfolio.

Learning Tasks/Activities

      Mini Lesson #1: The teacher will break the students into groups depending on their abilities (mixture of all abilities) and the students will spend 10 minutes each discussing the major issues that faced the North, South, & West/Great Plains.

Mini Lesson #2: The teacher have the students return to their normal seats then they will play a word connection game.  The teacher will have a list of terms, people, and events that affected the Gilded Age.  The students will then connect as many things to that term, person, or event. 

Mini Lesson #3: The teacher will go over any remaining test items needed.

 

 

 

Text Materials

Student notes, Gilded Age portfolio, and teacher handout

Closure

      Teacher will remind the students of their test on Wednesday & that their portfolio is due in Wednesday. 

Remediation/Intervention 

Breaking into groups according to abilities.  The teacher will be able to mediate throughout the classroom to see how students are doing on their group and individual assignments.  The teacher will make sure that all directions are clear before the assignment begins.

Enrichment/Challenge for upper 25%

Students are encouraged to relate as many topics as possible, and posslbe extra credit could be awarded to the group/ indiviual who makes the most connections.

Group Composition (If used)

Mini Lesson #1: The teacher will break the students into groups depending on their abilities (mixture of all abilities) and the students will spend 10 minutes each discussing the major issues that faced the North, South, & West/Great Plains.

Assessment (pre and/or post)

Formal assessment will be on Wednesday

Wednesday

 

Focus of Lesson

 (Student-Friendly Objective)

     Students will be formally assessed on their knowledge content of the Gilded Age

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

      Students will review their notes for 5 minutes before the test.  Students will turn in their Gilded Age portfolios.

Learning Tasks/Activities

      Mini Lesson #1: Students will take their test.

Mini Lesson #2: Students will begin working on their Progressive Portfolio following their Gilded Age test.  Terms will be due on Friday.

 

Text/Materials

Gilded Age Test, Progressive Portfolio

Closure

      The teacher will remind them to mark the due dates of all their assignments in their Progressive Portfolio.

Remediation/Intervention 

Any student requiring extra time will be allowed extra time to work on their test during their break, learning strategies class, or after school.

Enrichment/Challenge for upper 25%

Students will be asked to not only define the important terms, people, and events of the Progressive Era, but they will also be asked explain why the terms, people, and events were important and how it impacted history and the Progressive Era.  (All students are encouraged to do this, but the teacher expects for the more advanced students to take this assignment to the next level.  Extra effort will equal extra points on their portfolio.)

Group Composition (If used)

If all students are finished with their test students may work together on their portfolio terms, people, & events.

Assessment (pre and/or post

Students will be taking their Gilded Age Test

Thursday

 

Focus of Lesson

 (Student-Friendly Objective)

      The teacher will be introducing the Progressive Era and the major issues that were addressed during this time period.

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

      Students will work on their terms, events, & people of the Progressive Era (due Friday)

 

Learning Tasks/Activities

      Mini Lesson #1: Teacher will introduce the major topics of the Progressive Era such as: Teddy Roosevelt, trustbusters, Meat Inspection Act, Pure Food & Drug Act, 16th, 17th & 18th Amendments, etc.

Mini Lesson #2: Students will take an informal pre-test on the Progressive era

Mini Lesson #3: The students will watch a video clip from Teddy Roosevelt's presidency, and they will analyze the presidential decisions that he made and decide if they would have taken the country into a different direction.

 

Text/Materials

United States History 1877-Present, The Presidents (video), Progressive Portfolio

Closure

     

The teacher will recap the lesson and remind the students that their important terms, events, and people will be due on Friday.

Remediation/Intervention 

The teacher will walk throughout the classroom checking to make sure that every student is activily engaged and understanding his/her assignment. 

Enrichment/Challenge for upper 25%

Students will be asked to not only define the important terms, people, and events of the Progressive Era, but they will also be asked explain why the terms, people, and events were important and how it impacted history and the Progressive Era.  (All students are encouraged to do this, but the teacher expects for the more advanced students to take this assignment to the next level.  Extra effort will equal extra points on their portfolio.)

Group Composition (If Used)

Students will be able to work together on their important terms, events, and people of the Progressive Era. 

Assessment (pre and/or post

Pre-test on the Progressive Era

Friday

 

Focus of Lesson

 (Student-Friendly Objective)

      The teacher will continue the discussion of the Progressive Era and how society, the landscape, and people changed.

Eagle Challenge

(3-5 minutes)

      Students will work on their essay (due Tuesday)

Learning Tasks/Activities

      Mini Lesson #1: The teacher will lead a discussion on the how the problems of the Gilded Age were addressed/fixed during the Progressive Era.  The following topics will be explored: William Howard Taft, how their addressed sanitation and health issues during this era, and Clayton Anti-trust Act.

Mini Lesson #2: The students will watch a video clip from William Howard Taft's presidency, and they will analyze the presidential decisions that he made and decide if they would have taken the country into a different direction.

Mini Lesson #3: While the teacher is checking for completion of their important terms, people, and events of the Progressive Era, the students will be working in partners to discuss President Taft's accomplishments.  They will also be able to collectively work on their Progessive Portfolios.

 

Text/Materials

United States History 1877-Present, The Presidents (video), Progressive Portfolio

Closure

      The teacher will recap the lesson and remind the students that their Progressive Era essay will be due on Tuesday.

Remediation/Intervention 

The teacher will walk throughout the classroom checking to make sure that every student is activily engaged and understanding his/her assignment.

Enrichment/Challenge for upper 25%

All students are expected to write an essay on the Progressive Era including the important events and their outcomes, but they will also be asked explain in detail why the terms, people, and events were important and how it impacted history and the Progressive Era in their essay.  (All students are encouraged to do this, but the teacher expects for the more advanced students to take this assignment to the next level.  Extra effort will equal extra points on their portfolio.)

Group Composition (If Used)

Students will be able to work with a partner on their Progressive Portfolio for peer mentoring.

Assessment (pre and/or post)

Informal assessment will be given as the teacher recap the day's lesson and discovers what the students have retained/understand and what needs to be readdressed on Monday.